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ECommerceTimes.com

E-smith Adds To Linux Fervor

By Matthew Beale
Aug 31, 1999 12:00 AM PT

E-smith, formerly known as Powerframe Internetworking, joined the recent flurry of Linux-related activity by announcing version 3.0 of a server and gateway product that turns a PC into a turnkey Internet server.

E-smith Adds To Linux Fervor

The e-smith server and gateway -- which is designed to provide small and medium-sized businesses with Web hosting services -- features an Apache Web server and the latest version of the Red Hat Linux distribution. E-smith spokesperson Kim Morrison told the E-Commerce Times that the product "offers all of the benefits -- such as scalability, reliability, functionality and performance -- that come with Linux, adding incredible ease-of-use."

"It installs automatically and the end user doesn't ever need to know a UNIX command," commented Morrison. "They configure the system using a very simple console, and after that, the network is administered using a Web-based interface from their desktop."

Simplifying the process of adopting the Linux operating system (OS) is central to the e-smith corporate mission, as well as making it accessible for small and mid-sized businesses. According to the company, the product -- which combines e-mail, file sharing, routing and security capabilities -- can even convert a retired 60Mhz Pentium computer into an Internet server for a sizable office.

E-Commerce Is the Next Step

Although the latest version of the e-smith server and gateway lacks transaction capabilities, the company is looking to e-commerce for future releases. E-smith has been considering Health Kitchens (HKS), a Linux-based operation, for possible collaboration in the development of transaction processing.

"There's also definitely the possibility that another organization out there that we're collaborating with might want to use the e-smith server and gateway as the development platform for other kinds of applications," said Morrison. "I'm sure that that's going to happen, and I imagine that e-commerce will be one of the first ones to be developed by another organization."

Additionally, the Ottawa, Canada-based e-smith offers server and gateway product users a "server-only" option for use behind firewalls, support for both DHCP and Dynamic DNS service and support for dial on demand service.

Linux Mania

With a recent high profile IPO (initial public offering) which raised $4.55 billion (US$), Red Hat, Inc. has expanded the open-source movement into a new arena. Despite the inevitable projections for a major sell-off -- and bitter recriminations by some Linux developers who were essentially barred from participating in the IPO -- analysts are looking for the next Red Hat. This week, a couple of companies took a significant step toward claiming the title.

Among them was Corel (Nasdaq: CORL), whose stock surged more than 24% at the close of trading last week. The Toronto, Canada-based company will soon be introducing both a Linux version of WordPerfect Office 2000 and its own distribution of the open-source OS.

Applix, Inc., another provider of Linux-based solutions, experienced a meteoric 64% stock increase last week. This development only added to an environment where investors who had never heard of open-source software began talking GNU, and companies who had only flirted with the notion of a Linux-based offering raced to prepare a market-ready product. According to many experts, the trend will be increasing in coming months.


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What do you think about Hillary Clinton's use of private email servers during her term as Secretary of State?
She broke the law and should go to jail.
She violated guidelines -- the issue is overblown.
She placed important state department information at risk.
Her servers might have been more secure than the government's.
I really don't care one way or the other.